Saturday, August 29, 2015

Kissing Venuses 11: Sylvia and Aurelia



These two soapy lovelies appeared in the October 1984 issue of the French magazine New Look.  The brainchild (perhaps brain isn't necessarily the correct organ) of Lui founder Daniel Filipacchi it offered a very similar, glossy style of photography with, compared to Lui at the time, some rather more explicit poses. 




We first experienced two girls cleaning each other up like this when we were at college.  Our girlfriend at the time taking her best lady friend into the shower and giving her a good soaping up for our benefit, as a birthday present for Triple P.  Very entertaining it was too.  While they weren't quite as lovely as these two they had larger busts and their passion was convincingly authentic.

Monday, August 24, 2015

Les Deux Amies by Josef Lambeaux (1852-1908)



 This passionate and surprisingly graphic bronze of two women is by the Belgian sculptor Jozef Lambeaux.  Lambeaux was born in Antwerp and studied at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts there.  More influential on his style was his membership of a group of young artists called the 'Van Beers Clique'.  He exhibited his first work, War, in 1871.




He travelled to Paris and produced a number of sculptures there and then went on to Rome.  On his return he largely concentrated on sculptures that featured extreme animation in the figures.




His female figures have such an earthy sensuality that several of his sculptures were suppressed until well into the second half of the twentieth century. 




Stroking the head of her lover the girl underneath squirms in ecstasy at the attention of her friend's face on her groin.  There is nothing coy about this piece; it is genuine erotic art.


Friday, August 21, 2015

The Seduction of Fifi by Richard Fegley




Someone commenting on my Playgirl and Viva couples post observed that some of the seventies Oui couples pictorials were very good and as we haven't posted any of them in their entirety we thought we would start with this one, which resonates with Triple P for all sorts of reasons.  Primarily, of course, it is because it is a period piece set, looking at the clothes, in the early years of the Twentieth Century.




This pictorial, called The Seduction of Fifi appeared in the October 1976 issue of Oui.  The photographer was Playboy regular Richard Fegley (1936-2001).  Oui had been the men's magazine in the seventies that first really went in for couples pictorials and was certainly the first (in their premier issue four years previously, in October 1972) to include men in their centrefolds.




The story behind the pictorial, such as it is, centres on virginal stenographer Vivian 'Fifi' Wooster as she is seduced by husband and wife photographers the Cooper-Smiths, when she visits their studio for a portrait.




The predatory husband and wife team soon have Fifi down to her period lingerie.  The costumes are quite good as an approximation of underthings of the period although without that feminine staple of the time, the corset.




The photographers, according to the text anyway, quiz Fifi as to her untouched status.  "No one ever laid his lips to you like this?" asks the photographer.  "Miss Wooster thinks a moment.  "No," she answers."




Having two ladies, of course, enables Fegley to indulge in the newly popular girl/girl interactions which would get more and more common in men's magazines over the decade, although, perhaps, rather less in Oui than some others.






So these two shots of Mrs  Cooper-Smith and Fifi interacting are quite bold for Oui at the time.  Stockings and lace up boots help immeasurably in the presentation, of course.




Threesomes were also unusual in Oui (I can think of one other) and, again. this one of Mrs Cooper-Smith seemingly guiding her husband's mouth towards Fifi's groin was unusually assertive too.






The setting, with its painted backdrop is exactly as you would have expected for a photographic shoot at the beginning of the twentieth century.  The self-caressing shot is very mid-seventies, however!




It is all rather reminiscent of the amusing 1990 novel Kingdom Swann by Miles Gibson (subsequently made into an amusing TV miniseries) Gentlemen's Relish, starring Billy Connolly.  This was also about a photographer shooting saucy pictures at the beginning of the twentieth century. 




The photographer demonstrates the rear entry position with his wife for the benefit of Fifi while Mrs Cooper-Smith's tongue flickers above Fifi's fluff.




At last Fifi herself succumbs to the photographer (from the rear as well, it should be noted).



The final shot has the only, partial, penis reveal in the whole shoot.  Fegley's pictorial is fun without descending into the dreaded 'comedy' approach.  Although the ladies flash their labia several times it is suggestive rather than really explicit (and certainly a step or two behind what Penthouse was now showing).  The period aspects are handled really quite well and the only let down is the grainy soft-focus photography.




It was popular with readers and in January 1977 Oui published an appreciative letter from Mr John McLaughlin of Atlantic City who wrote: "The story and pictures that make up The Seduction of Fifi (0ctober) are beyond a doubt the most delightfully sexy I've ever seen in any Magazine."  The letter gave Oui an opportunity to publish another shot from the pictorial (above).

Sunday, August 16, 2015

Playgirl and Viva Couples Pictorials 1: the 1970s Part 1


Playgirl, June 1973


While we focus on men's magazine extensively in the Seduction of Venus we are well aware that, beginning in the nineteen seventies, there were several magazines that attempted to provide what the likes of Playboy and Penthouse provided but for women.  Principal among these was Playgirl which was billed as a "sex-positive, fun-oriented feminist response to Hugh Hefner's empire”.  The first issue proper was in June 1973, about which there were instant complaints because of the lack of penises in the magazine; something that was resolved very quickly.  Initially, no-one thought that a magazine that objectified men in the same way that Playboy objectified women would do well but in the first six months of its publication the circulation went up from 600,000 a month to 2,000,000.  Douglas Lambert, the creator of Playgirl, got his idea from the success of Cosmopolitan's nude centrefold of Burt Reynolds in April 1972.  We're not showing that picture here as it makes us feel quite nauseous.  We don't mind pictures of naked men but naked hairy men give us the creeps!


Playgirl, October 1973


Our particular friend B sent us a lively email a few weeks ago suggesting we compared the couples pictorials in Playgirl with the likes of those in Penthouse and Oui, which, of course, we have featured quite extensively, from the same period.  Frankly, we didn't even know that Playgirl featured couples pictorials but that is because we have never seen a copy of the magazine.  We just have a mental image of very hairy men with mustaches (sorry again, Mr Reynolds) posing awkwardly, as they demonstrate that most men's bodies are just not very attractive (some penises excepted; we actually don't mind looking at nice penises).  However, she has sent us some pictures and C chipped in with some too and so, at their suggestion,  we are doing some posts on these, starting with the birth of Playgirl and its  rival Viva in the seventies.


Viva, December 1973


Not long after Playgirl appeared, Bob Guccione launched his own equivalent, Viva in September 1973 (the first issue was October's).  Guccione had been interviewed about what he thought of Playgirl and went on record saying that he thought that the male nudes in Playgirl were "contrived" and lacking in naturalness.  He also said he wouldn't use celebrities in Viva (the first six months of Playgirl's centrefolds were all (minor) celebrities).  He did say that he thought women would be more interested in couples pictorials.  In November 1973 Dr Michael J Goldstein, a professor of psychology at UCLA, agreed with this point saying that he didn't "think women generally get excited looking at these pictures" but that "my research indicates that most women enjoy looking at photographs of nude couples more than of men posing alone".


Viva, August 1974


Employing the same photographers (and many of the same models) as shot for his men's magazine Penthouse, Viva's couples pictorials were not that different, not surprisingly, than Penthouse's. 



Penthouse Loving Couples,1975


In fact in 1975 Guccione published a magazine called Penthouse's Loving Couples which included not only couples pictorials from Penthouse but also ones from Viva.  The style was so similar you couldn't tell which one came from which magazine and the publication itself didn't tell you.  In fact no less than eight out of the eleven pictorials originated in Viva but the Viva name was only visible inside not on the cover. Presumably Guccione didn't want to put men off from buying it.

Playgirl too, started regular couples pictorials.  Viva (unlike Playgirl which continued for another three decades) had folded by 1980 but we have several examples of their couples pictorials (thanks to C) we can include, by way of comparison.


Oui, October 1972


Across at their male oriented equivalents Penthouse had only had two couples pictorials by the end of 1973 and they wouldn't feature any in 1974.  Playboy had no tradition of couples pictorials at all at this time.  It was the Playboy owned Oui which was pushing boy/girl pictorials.  In fact, their very first centrefold in their debut issue of October 1972 had featured a man under a sheet with their girl.


Oui, January 1973

By January 1973 they had a naked man in their centrefold as well as a girl.  This however, was not popular. "I was quite disappointed to see a male nude in the January issue of Oui" wrote Laurence from Michigan. "What inmate wants a centerfold with a guy in it hanging from his wall?" asked Joseph from Yardville Reformatory in New Jersey.  Oh dear!


Oui, December 1973


However by the end of the year Oui published a pictorial in its December 1973 issue, shot by Jeanloup Sieff, that was so popular it actually produced a sequel the following year. An afternoon with Aunt Nancy had an older woman seducing her nephew. The lady (French model Denise Rolland) posed for several implied sex pictures.   


Cavalier, May 1973


Interestingly it was Playboy's long running rival Cavalier which also dipped its toe into the couples pictorial water early on with a cheap-looking and playful, rather than sensual, set in mid-1973.


Playgirl, August 1973


Playgirl, August 1973


One of the earliest, if not the first, couples pictorial in Playgirl accompanied a perfectly conventional travelogue about Marrakesh.  Although there were a number of tourist type shots of the city most of the photos featured the man and his girl.  Interestingly, although he got naked in some of the pictures she kept her (admittedly wet and see through) dress on throughout.  This, of course, being the most noticeable difference from a men's magazine pictorial, where it would be the woman's body which would be showcased.  Nether of them showed their pubic regions but there some nice kisses and caresses.


Playboy, February 1970


The man is Alan Landers, famous for being the Winston cigarettes man in the sixties advertisements, so he would have been 42 at the time.  The girl is actress Jamie Lyn Bauer (24 at the time) who was just starting a long stint on TV soap The Young and the Restless and would appear in many other TV series and films over the next forty years.  As Norma Bauer (her real name) she had appeared on the cover of February 1970's Playboy.


Viva, October 1973


The first couples pictorials in Viva appeared in their premier issue from October 1973.  Unlike Playgirl, which was featuring couples on their covers, Viva would often feature, perhaps oddly for a womens' magazine, a photograph of just a girl.


Viva, October 1973


Viva, October 1973


This pictorial,  The Picnic, like quite a few at the time, had a period setting; in this case two English aristocrats at the beginning of the twentieth century.  Shot by Ron Volkmann, the woman is largely more naked than the man and while she flashes her pubic hair, unlike in Playgirl's initial couples effort, he does not.


Playgirl, October 1973


Playgirl, October 1973


Playgirl's offering that month took the opposite approach with its pictorial of the couple on the cover.  The girl kept her shorts and bikini top on while the man flashed his cock (just).  This was, when you think about it, quite reasonable for a magazine aimed at women.


Playgirl, October 1973


The Penthouse owned Viva, oddly, often had pictures of just the girl, naked, in their couples pictorials.


 Viva, November 1973


Viva, November 1973


The second issue of Viva had another girl on the front, Penthouse Pet of the Month for May 1973, Sandi Greco, but this time the couples pictorial was contemporary.  Bob Guccione had said, earlier in the year, that he wasn't going to have celebrities in his magazine but the man is actor Ben Murphy, then very famous. following his successful TV series Alias Smith and Jones.



Viva, November 1973


The lady is Bess Cofield, then lead singer in the W.W. Fancy rock group, (although we couldn't find anything out about either) according to the accompanying text.  They hadn't met before the pictorial was shot by Earl Miller but have a nice chemistry in their pictures.


Viva, November 1973


Over the course of the shoot, according to Viva, the weekend they spent together "constituted a brief, authentic, and thoroughly shared relationship for them both."  The implication being that they actually had sex, of course.


Viva, November 1973


They certainly look a lot more touchy-feely than the couple in The Picnic and there are some hands loitering in some very intimate areas.  In a couple of shots Murphy flashes the root of his penis which was something Penthouse hadn't shown in their couples pictorials at that point.  Considering this was a celebrity pictorial it was successfully erotic and conveyed some real intimacy.


Viva, December 1973


There was another girl on the front of Viva for December 1973 Many of these models were Penthouse Pets, as in this case where we have a portrait of  September 1973's Pet of the Month, Anneka de Lorenzo.


Viva, December 1973


The couples pictorial that month was by the distinguished photographer J Frederick Smith.  Entitled Secrets from my Diary, this was another period piece set in 1673.


Viva, December 1973


There were two firsts for a Viva couples pictorial in this one: the first clearly depicted penis (top) and the first real sex position (above) rather than just some coy caressing.  Penthouse wouldn't have either of these in a couples pictorial for another eighteen months.


Playgirl, January 1974


 Playgirl, January 1974


Playgirl, January 1973


Into 1974 and January's couples pictorial for Playgirl was playful rather than passionate.  The man is naked throughout but doesn't flash his penis at all.  The girl, at least, gets her bottoms off in one shot.


Viva, January 1974


Penthouse, October 1972


Another Penthouse Pet appeared on the cover of January's Viva; in this case it was
October 1972, Janet Dunphy.  The picture was even taken from her original Pet of the Month shoot by Bob Guccione.


Viva, January 1974


Although both Playgirl and Viva included women in their male model shoots the ones in Playgirl were invariably dressed, whereas, as we can see from this January 1974 example of stuntman and actor Nick Dmitri, Viva got in some naked women too.


Playgirl, February 1974


Playgirl, February 1974


Playgirl, February 1974


Again, Playgirl put a couple on the cover for February 1974 (the feeling was that women needed a female figure to identify with rather than just having a man on his own) and the pictorial inside had a nineteen fifties theme.  While the lady stripped down to her underwear the man went all the way.   Shot by staff photographer David Meyer, this time there were quite a few nice kissing shots, which upped the passion quotient compared with previous pictorials.


Viva, February 1974


Viva, February 1974


Viva, February 1974


Viva had yet another solo woman on the cover in February but their couples content was not the usual fictitious story illustrating the pictorial but a piece on tantric sex and its history, giving them the opportunity for some not very risque shots.  Photographed by Zee Gajda, who also did a number of pictorials for Penthouse, it certainly had nothing like the passion of Playgirl's offering that month.


Playgirl, March 1974


Playgirl, March 1974


Playgirl, March 1974


Playgirl's couples pictorial for March was posited on the basis that with the oil crises in full swing people would have to go back to nature and wouldn't be able to rely on technology in the future.  So they had a few random farmers falling out of their clothes and having frolics in the fields.  Just one quick flash of the male member in this one but more good kissing.


Viva, March 1974


Yet another solo girl on the cover for Viva in a very retro looking cover. 


Viva, March 1974


The couples pictorial that month was called New York Story and was by former illustrator and top photographer J Frederick Smith, who also would do quite a lot of work for Playboy, including a controversial lesbian cover the following year.


Viva, March 1974


This pictorial, in contrast to the previous month's and also Playgirl's March issue had no less than seven pictures which featured the man's penis, including this one, where the young lady is actually touching it with her fingertips.


Oui, April 1974


 Oui, May 1974

The previous month Oui had produced a cover which, for the first time had men on it, trailing a pictorial about the circus.  For May the man on the cover was more obviously part of a couple.  That month two of Oui's pictorials were boy/girl ones at a time when Penthouse had only had two ever.


Oui. May 1974


Neither pictorial was really raunchy, however, and, indeed, one featured a pillow fight but at least that couple were shown kissing whereas in the second one a chaste kiss of a bare shoulder was as naughty as it got.


Oui, May 1974


This approach, however, did not go down well with many of the readers. One complained about the May issue that "two out of the three (pictorials) featured couples. Ditto the subscription ad and the cover of the issue. He continued: "Part of the attraction of magazines such as Oui is fantasy...with the introduction of a partner, however, these fantasies are shattered. Please give us the girls and leave the studs to Playgirl and Viva."


Oui, May 1974


The offending ad featured the couple from the controversial January 1973 centrefold.  Penthouse had similar complaints initially when they started to field more couples pictorials.  It highlighted a key issue regarding erotic photographs in magazines at the time in that some seemed to be suggesting that it could only be erotic if members of the opposite sex alone were depicted.  Actually, most erotica from ancient times until the birth of photography depicted couples. What gradually happened over time, during the first half of the twentieth century, was that it became more acceptable to show pictures of girls alone (the pin-up effect) whereas the addition of men into photographs risked crossing the line into pornography. These magazines were dealing with a legacy largely circumscribed by Playboy in the mid-fifties. It was Guccione and Penthouse who started to introduce couples into the pictorials as part of their greater concentration on sex in itself (rather than as part of a wider lifestyle plus pinups approach as Playboy posited).  Certainly, in the initial couples pictorials in Playgirl the women are, more often than not, dressed while the men are naked (this was also the approach taken in early couples pictorials in Paul Raymond's magazines in Britain where the man, in that case, would remain largely clothed).  


Playgirl, May 1974


Playgirl, May 1974


Playgirl, May 1974


April had Playgirl's female model as fully frontally naked as the man for a change., bringing them in line with the approach in Viva.   A tactile looking close up of the girl stroking the man's lower belly was trumped by a shot of the man seemingly rather more excited as he kissed the girl's breast, her thigh touching his member.



Viva, May 1974


Viva, May 1974


May's Viva had the female model's head very close to her partner's penis in this shot.  There was just a suggestion that he might not be completely flaccid, but it was not clear due to the angle, something all the magazines used to play on (so to speak) at this time.


 Oui, June 1974


Oui took no notice of the naysayers and although they had dispensed with the couple on the cover for June there were a lot of men in their pictorials again. A piece featuring the then wife of film director Russ Meyer, Edy Williams, also included a male model, Richard Dow, in every picture of her.


Oui, June 1974


Further on in the magazine there was a pictorial about nudist beaches of the world which included several pictures of full frontal men.


Oui, June 1974


The innovation for June was that instead of having a centrefold girl they had a centrefold couple. They had included a man in their centrefold picture of Florence Fossorier in their very first issue back in October 1972, of course, but at least they had had the majority of the pictures just featuring Florence. Here, however, it was a couple right from the start.  In particular, it was this picture that got them into trouble with some of their readers as, six months before Penthouse risked it, their male model in a couples pictorial is just showing a glimpse of his cock. "Please take the June issue of Oui and shove it up your ass," wrote someone from New Jersey, elegantly. "'For the Man of the World' should read 'For the queer of the World'" he said, referring to the magazine's tagline. Yes, the issue of the depiction of the penis caused a split in the readership. Oui published equal numbers of letters from each viewpoint but the men stayed, at least for the time being.


 Viva, June 1974


Viva, June 1974


Viva's June couples pictorial featured Suzanne and the impressive Eddie.  In a pictorial marking the first anniversary of Viva, in October 1974's Penthouse, this shot became the first in the magazine featuring a penis in a boy/girl photo.


Oui, July 1974


Oui had become the first men's magazine to put couples on the cover regularly.  Going one better than Playgirl and Viva they then started to feature celebrities with their real girlfriends, rather than a model, in some quite sensuous shots.


Oui, July 1974


Inside, the first pictorial for July was also a couples one, featuring Andy Warhol star Joe Dallesandro and his girlfriend Stefania Casini.  They were photographed in Rome looking authentically affectionate.


Playgirl, July 1974


Playgirl, July 1974


The 'Playgirl Fantasy', as the magazine named their couples pictorials, for July had a couple cavorting in the desert.  It was not very naughty by the standards of some of the previous ones but the girl did get her clothes off as well as the man.


 Viva, July 1974
 Viva, July 1974


For July, Viva presented a nice undressing sequence for their cover stars over two pages in a pictorial by J Frederick Smith.  Lots of cavorting on the beach and in a hammock.


Viva, July 1974


This double page spread from the pictorial had the girl touching her male companion's penis in a very unusually assertive way for the time.


Oui, August 1974


Oui, despite the negative letters, risked putting a man in the centrefold again but this was a much more passionate shot than previous pictures, as the man slides his hand down over the girl's pussy and they seem poised for a kiss.


Playboy, September 1974


Even Playboy was starting to have couples pictorials. The September issue contained one called Do it Now, about having spontaneous sex in unusual places. It had some pretty passionate photographs compared with some of the other men's and women's magazines.


Oui, September 1974


Another celebrity couple appeared on the cover of Oui in September and ws featured in a pictorial inside. French skier Jean-Claude Killy had won all three Alpine gold medals at the 1968 Olympics in Grenoble and became the best known skier in the world, with an international profile.  This was, however, the last cover that featured a couple for Oui.


Oui, September 1974


Killy was shown with his wife, French actress Danièle Gaubert (they had met on the set of a film, Snow Job (1972)). It certainly gave an added sensual frisson to their pictures.


 Playgirl, September 1974


Playgirl, September 1974


Playgirl, September 1974


Playgirl's September couples pictorial was accompanied, as was quite often the case in this period by a (rather dreadful) poem.  The pictorial itself was quite well done, though, with some nice kissing and caressing.


 Viva, October 1974

 Viva, October 1974


Viva's October couple had fun in and around an old truck.  The poses were becoming more sexual and less romantic.


Oui, October 1974


In October's issue of Oui, in a pictorial inspired by the story of Adam and Eve, Oui had this boldly displayed penis.


Oui, November 1974


The following month Oui presented it's first celebrity penis attached to actor Peter Brown, of medical soap Days of Our Lives, here photographed with his friend Robin Loring (who he had met on the set of the soap) in the surf at Cabo San Lucas.  Brown, who was thirty-nine at the time had just divorced his third wife so no doubt enjoyed Miss Loring's charms to the full.


Playgirl, October 1974


Another poem for Playgirl; in this one the twist is that after her night of passion the woman pays the man for her entertainment.


Viva, November 1974


Viva, November 1979


Viva's November issue contained what would eventually become quite a well know pictorial featuring a naked copulating couple in a bare kitchen.  It wasn't explicit but the use of slow shutter speeds gave it some movement and energy.  It was very much at the arty end of such pictorials at the time and was the work of Art Kane who was, at one point, the art director of both Viva and Penthouse.  The two magazines shared an art department so it is not surprising that their couples pictorials looked so similar in the mid seventies.


 Playgirl, November 1974


 Playgirl, November 1974


The rather baffled looking chap, one Bill Cable, on the cover of November's Playgirl featured in a rare non-couple cover.  He was the star of the couples pictorial inside, however, which was a bodice ripping period piece.


Playgirl, November 1974


The pictorial climaxed with this shot of his lady friend appearing to be quite entranced, in this really rather assertive shot.


Hustler, November 1974


More and more men's magazines were appearing at this point and Larry Flynt's Hustler, which in the late seventies would do more to get penises into men's magazines than any other publication, had their first, albeit penis free, couples pictorial in their fifth issue.


Penthouse, December 1974


Bob Guccione had been featuring penises in his couples sets in Viva but their inclusion by Oui in their pictorials must have been something of a surprise for him given that Penthouse was supposed to be the most cutting edge and daring of the men's magazines.  In December, he included his first cock in this boy/boy/girl pictorial Bawdy Bathers (the second most popular pictorial on this blog), where the lucky gentleman in question seems about to get it touched by Joyce Gibson. 

So, in the eighteen months since Playgirl's penis free launch (and resulting storm of complaints from women and the gay men who bought the magazine) the couples pictorial had become a staple of both Playgirl and Viva.  Playgirl, initially, kept its women rather more clothed while Viva, betraying its Penthouse origins, had their girls naked and their pictorials really indistinguishable from the very few couples ones they had had to date in the men's magazine.  Next time we will look at 1975 and 1976 and see how the women's pictorials compared with ones from the men's magazines at the time.